Tag Archives: Aboriginal

EVENT: Indigenous Perspectives on the War of 1812

INDIGENOUS PERSPECTIVES ON THE WAR OF 1812
Alternative Histories and Artistic Representations

Panelists:
Alan Corbiere, Ojibwe Cultural Foundation, Shelly Niro, artist, and curator Carol Jacobs, Brock University Elder in residence

Moderated by Renée Bedard, Tecumseh Centre

PLUS the exhibit:
Four Artists from Six Nations, paintings & photographs by Haudenosaunee artists

Friday, March 23rd, 3 – 5 pm | Niagara Artists Centre | 354 St. Paul Street | http://www.nac.org/home.html

This event is organized by the Social Justice and Equity Studies Program at Brock University in place of the Niagara Social Justice Forum for 2012. We hope you can join us.

Sponsors: Social Justice and Equity Studies MA, History Department, Aboriginal Education Council, Tecumseh Centre for Aboriginal Research and Education, Aboriginal Student Services, Women’s and Gender Studies, Brock University, and the Niagara Artists Centre

Questions? Contact Professor Margot Francis: mfrancis@brocku.ca

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nsjf 2011: Reel Injun

evening event of the 2011 Niagara Social Justice Forum:
REEL INJUN: A film by Neil Diamond

The evening event for the 2011 Niagara Social Justice Forum features a screening of the fantastic documentary Reel Injun followed by a short panel discussion. Panelists are: Laurie Kirk, Michelle Sherry and Lacey Lewis.

Schedule:
6:30-7:00 Enjoying victuals provided by Rise Above for purchase
7:00-7:05 Laurie Kirk will introduce the film
7:05-8:30 Screening of Reel Injun
8:30-8:40 Break
8:40-8:55 Panelists Laurie Kirk, Michelle Sherry and Lacey Lewis will speak to the film
8:55-9:30 Open the floor to the audience for questions and discussion

Location:
onefortyfive Gallery – 145 King Street, Downtown St. Catharines
For directions visit the onefortyfive Gallery website:
http://www.onefortyfive.com/145/Home.html
Cost of event: FREE!

About the Film: Reel Injun
Hollywood has made over 4000 films about Native people; over 100 years of movies defining how Indians are seen by the world.

Reel Injun takes an entertaining and insightful look at the Hollywood Indian, exploring the portrayal of North American Natives through the history of cinema.

Travelling through the heartland of America, Cree filmmaker Neil Diamond looks at how the myth of “the Injun” has influenced the world’s understanding – and misunderstanding – of Natives.

With candid interviews with directors, writers, actors and activists, including Clint Eastwood, Jim Jarmusch, Robbie Robertson, Sacheen Littlefeather, John Trudell and Russell Means, clips from hundreds of classic and recent films, including Stagecoach, Little Big Man, The Outlaw Josey Wales, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, and Atanarjuat the Fast Runner, Reel Injun traces the evolution of cinema’s depiction of Native people from the silent film era to today.

VIEW THE Reel Injun Trailer:

For more information about the film visit the Reel Injun website: http://www.reelinjunthemovie.com

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nsjf 2011 Workshops: Session 3

Niagara Social Justice Forum 2011: Saturday, April 9th from 9 am – 5pm Pond Inlet, Brock University: FREE! Lunch Provided :)

1:30-2:30pm: SESSION 3: Workshops

Workshop 3a: Back to the Source: The Right to Water Access – Elizabeth Sauer, Liz Morelli, Frank Fohr and Nancy Santamaria
Location: MC C407
“Back to the Source” will heighten awareness about the critical issue of the national and international right to water access. This workshop offers a unique perspective on the connection between our choices and their implications for the peoples of the Global South. The multimedia workshop will include a DVD on The Story of Bottled Water, a powerpoint presentation on the consequences of the privatization of water in the South; a skit dramatizing debates over the issue; and an invitation to create Bottled Water Free Zones and advocate for the right to water at the local, national, and international levels.

Workshop 3b: Resisting Orders, Crossing Borders – Karrie Porter, Michelle Robidoux and The War Resisters Support Campaign, Niagara Chapter
Location: MC D308
Is it just that the Canadian government should deport Americans who have decided to seek asylum in this country rather than be redeployed to fight in an illegal war of occupation that has decimated Iraq and killed thousands upon thousands of its citizens? Abandoning their country, friends and family to seek a new life has been a difficult and often painful experience for war resisters and they are grateful to have the support of the majority of Canadians. American war resisters come from small towns and cities in economically depressed regions, much like Niagara. Brock students and Niagara residents have much to learn from these men and women. In this important workshop, a local war resister will share her family’s story.

Workshop 3c: Migrant Workers – Richard C. Mitchell, David Fancy, Frupo N. Doam, Rangel R. Zapata, Jackie Barrett-Green, Jennifer Pothier, Chris Woodall, Jeff Burch and Janet McLaughlin
Location: MC D309
The workshop aim is to communicate contemporary legal, labour, health and advocacy issues building upon outcomes from last year’s SJ Forum when Niagara Region migrant worker representatives requested Brock faculty assist them in engaging in a public, participatory, democratic conversation focused on their concerns.

Workshop 3d: The Problematic yet Promising Relationship Between Faith and Social Justice – Bob McMillan and Troy Watson
Location: MC H313
How has faith both helped and hindered social justice movements throughout history? What positive aspects can postmodern Christian faith bring to social justice work? How can social justice help Christianity progress and mature into a more benevolent influence in our world? This workshop will explore these questions.

Workshop 3e: Aboriginal Diabetes: Hip Hop & The Empowering Voice of Aboriginal Youth – Laurie Sherry-Kirk, John Henhawk and Southern Ontario Diabetes Aboriginal Initiative
Location: MCD 303
This workshop discusses how Aboriginal youth are using the art of Hip Hop musicality as an organizing tool to address both the disproportionate levels of diabetes that are prevalent within their communities and also as a form of activism to resist the Coca-colonization and McDomination of Aboriginal people.

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nsjf 2010 featured in The St.Catharines Standard!

Conference shares the struggles of aboriginal women
Posted By MONIQUE BEECH , STANDARD STAFF
mbeech@stcatharinesstandard.ca

Monday, March 22, 2010

Standing before a room of 30 men and women — all different ages, races — Wendy Sturgeon explained how aboriginal women in Canada have become an ‘endangered species.’

The residential school system, which stripped away their children for more than 100 years, the executive director of charitable organization Niagara Chapter- Native Women Inc., told the group gathered in the Brock University classroom Saturday afternoon.

The forced assimilation into European culture, said Sturgeon, hosting one of several workshops during Brock’s fourth annual Niagara Social Justice Forum.

Being forced into a foreign culture where men reigned supreme.

In most traditional indigenous tribes in North America, women were in charge, she said. They were the decision makers about when to go to war, when to move.

That all began to change with the arrival of the Black Robes, or Christian missionaries, in the 1600s, Sturgeon said.

“They regarded us as savages and thought we had to be civilized,” Sturgeon said. “We were a full-fledged, well-functioning society for years.”

Women have suffered the most in the years following the Indian Act of 1876. They were the ones who had to fight to keep their Indian status if they chose to marry a non-native man, she said.

Like other indigenous women around the world, decades of heartache has followed. Issues of extreme poverty, discrimination, and horrific violence, including murder, rape and torture.

This native baggage, as fellow presenter Marie Jones put it, is what aboriginal women have been carrying around and what’s been holding them back.

But all of her people are starting to wake up and are fighting oppression, said Jones, who is Mohawk from Six Nations.

It’s like being laid up for months with an injury, she said.

“Now we’re getting physiotherapy,” said Jones, an aboriginal child advocate with the Niagara Chapter-Native Women, Inc.

Sturgeon and Jones’ workshop, called Native Woman – Endangered Species, was one of 10 sessions led by Niagara residents during the day-long free forum. Topics ranged widely from protecting Niagara’s beautiful landscapes, to homeless youth to staying loyal to food produced in one’s own country.

About 200 people attended the day-long event, which was designed to give a variety of community groups the chance to share their commitment to overall social justice while addressing specific issues important to them.

“An event like this is a wonderful opportunity for groups in the community and groups on campus to connect with one another,” said Janet Conway, Canada Research Chair of the Social Justice at Brock and head of the forum.

“It’s great for the students to become aware that there are community organizations that are working on a myriad of issues in their own community and to get connected with them if they want to.”

The online version of this story can be found at:
http://www.stcatharinesstandard.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=2502096

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nsjf 2010 Workshops: Session 2

Niagara Social Justice Forum 2010: Saturday, March 20th from 9 a.m. – 5:45pm Pond Inlet, Brock University: FREE! Lunch Provided 🙂

11:30: SESSION 2: Workshops

Aboriginal Children in Care of Children’s Aid Societies
Presentation by: Wendy Sturgeon, Executive  Director, Niagara Chapter-Native Women Inc. & Marie Jones, Aboriginal Child Advocate, Niagara Chapter-Native Women Inc.
   Indigenous Children’s Rights are a social justice issue. There is a long history of dominant societies not only oppressing Indigenous individuals, families and entire communities but also creating legislation to keep Indigenous individuals in an inferior position, unable to succeed inter-generationally. This legislation was put in place to extinguish Native people altogether, and has been a powerful force of genocide.
   This presentation will take the observer / audience through the macro-view to the micro-view and will include the following: Truth Telling and History from a global / national Indigenous perspective, and an examination of the Ontario and Niagara perspective. There will be a fact sharing activity to demonstrate the effect of colonialism on indigenous children, particularly in North America and Canada.

The Other Side of Consciousness: Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgendered Queer Films
This event will feature 8 short films that combine media, story-telling and honesty to engage with issues of sexuality, race, disability, gender, family, love, loss, Diaspora, home and self-acceptance. This event will be a space for those that identify as LGBTQ, questioning, and/or allies to gather and watch LGBTQ stories. It will also facilitate discussion around filmmaking as a tool for social change, particularly as it applies to marginalized communities. *Q & A to follow with directors Onyinyechukwu Udegbe and Cristina Murano.

Conflict, Violence and Reconciliation: Lessons to be Drawn from Colombia
Invite conversation on conflict, violence and memory by using visual archival material. Focus on the visual record and memory as forms of labour, the meaning of truth and justice in visual media, the forms silence takes in the visual record, and solidarity work in the visual field in Canada.

Naming Homelessness
Our perceptions of youth homelessness tend to come from reports of youth in large urban centres or perhaps television ads for Covenant House in Toronto. The panel for this workshop will examine youth homelessness in Niagara.  We will hear from a participant in a study of youth homelessness and learn more about the causes and challenges of youth homelessness.

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nsjf 2010: Plenary & Evening Performance

Niagara Social Justice Forum 2010: Saturday, March 20th from 9 a.m. – 5:45pm Pond Inlet, Brock University: FREE! Lunch Provided 🙂

4:15: PLENARY: Film – Six Miles Deep (2009) about the Haudenosaunee Women and the Six Nations/Caledonia Conflict. Panel to follow with Director Sara Roque.

   On February 28, 2006, members of the Iroquois Confederacy (also known as the Haudenosaunee or People of the Longhouse) blockade a highway near Caledonia, Ontario to prevent a housing development on land that falls within their traditional territories.
   The ensuing confrontation makes national headlines for months. But less well known is the crucial role played by the clan mothers of the community – the traditional source of power in the Haudenosaunee Nation.
   With grace and honour, they rally the community on the Six Nations of the Grand River Reserve – with a population of 20,000, the largest reserve in Canada. It is the clan mothers who set the rules for conduct. And when the community’s chiefs ask people to abandon the barricades, it is the clan mothers who over-rule them. Six Miles Deep is an inspiring and compelling portrait of a group of women whose actions have led a cultural reawakening in their traditionally matriarchal community.

5:35: Drumming and Closing Remarks

Evening performance of The Vagina Monologues
Market Square, Downtown St.Catharines
7:30 p.m.
Price: $10: All proceeds go to the Niagara Sexual Assault Centre.
Hosted by OPIRG: Refreshments provided.

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Six Miles Deep: Plenary of the nsjf 2010

The Plenary for NSJF 2010 is featuring the film – Six Miles Deep (2009) about the Haudenosaunee Women and the Six Nations/Caledonia Conflict. Panel to follow with Director Sara Roque.

Six Miles Deep (2009) Director: Sara Roque – Run time: 43 minutes 22 seconds | Canada

On February 28, 2006, members of the Iroquois Confederacy (also known as the Haudenosaunee or People of the Longhouse) blockade a highway near Caledonia, Ontario to prevent a housing development on land that falls within their traditional territories. The ensuing confrontation makes national headlines for months. But less well known is the crucial role played by the clan mothers of the community – the traditional source of power in the Haudenosaunee Nation. Six Miles Deep is an inspiring and compelling portrait of a group of women whose actions have led a cultural reawakening in their traditionally matriarchal community.

Sara Roque is a multi-talented Metis filmmaker, writer, arts administrator and activist who has been involved in a number of community-based arts and Aboriginal history projects. Her short films have screened at ImagineNative Film Festival and the Splice This! Super8 film festival, and have been broadcast on MuchMusic. She is originally from northern Ontario and currently lives in Toronto. Six Miles Deep is her first documentary.

Visit the Six Miles Deep page at the NFB website here: http://www.onf-nfb.gc.ca/eng/collection/film/?id=56523

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