Tag Archives: Social Justice

Getting Your Message Out: How to Effectively Engage with Media

Many thanks to MJ Deschamps and Carissa Taylor, who presented at the NSJF 2015 and have agreed to share their presentation.

Click here to access the presentation.

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NSJF 2015 Photos

Thank you to everyone who came out and engaged in the 8th annual Niagara Social Justice Forum on January 31, 2015.

Here are a few photos that capture moments throughout the day:

Opening Plenary from D Butz 2

Members of the Organizing Committee speak during the Opening Plenary. Left to right: Jenna Parry, James McBride, Cassie Robinson, Carissa Taylor, Cara Nightingale.

audience0 from B McDonald

Participants engage in discussion during a workshop.

Carissa0 from B McDonald

Carissa Taylor presents during the workshop, “Getting your Message Out: How to Effectively Engage with Media.”

Workshop from D Butz

Participants take part in one of twelve workshops.

open mic 010 from B McDonald

A participant performs during the Open Mic.

lysanne firoz020 from B McDonald

SJES alumni Lysanne Louter, producer and director of Made in Bangladesh, speaks to current SJES student Firoz Alam during the Director’s Talk following the documentary screening.

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NSJF Invitation to Organize: 2013

Invitation to Organize Activities
Niagara Social Justice Forum 2013 – Our Own Backyard: A Local/Global Mash-up

Do you want to connect with student, activist or community groups committed to social justice?
Do you have a great idea for a workshop, performance, exhibit or other activity?
We want to hear from you!

Concept:
Hosted by the Social Justice and Equity Studies Graduate Program at Brock University, the 6th Niagara Social Justice Forum will include a day-long program of concurrent activities, including workshops, performances, exhibits and information tables in a fair-like atmosphere. This event typically attractsover 150 people from both campus and the community and explores a wide range of issues. All events are proposed and organized through an open call to people and groups on campus and in the community committed to social justice.

Goals:
The main goal of this event is to build relationships between student groups, activists and community organizations working on social justice issues in the Niagara region.

The purpose of this ‘Call’ is to invite individuals and groups with a strong activist orientation to submit a proposal to host a workshop, performance, exhibit or information table. The themes of proposed activities should havestrong local relevance. We encourage participatory activities that may involve art, music, drama or other experiential, embodied modes of interaction.

Proposals:
·    In one page or less, provide a title and brief description of the proposed activity, such as a workshop, performance, information table, poster, art exhibit.
·    Make clear its relevance to the event.
·    Suggest what groups might participate.
·    Identify who is proposing and will organize the activity. Include contact information.

We will accommodate as many proposals as possible, while aiming for a diversity of issues and kinds of activities. Those proposing activities are responsible for mobilizing the necessary resources to mount the activity. Forum organizers will co-ordinate the event, provide food, space, childcare, and technological support, as well as outreach and promotion of the Forum’s activities. The event is free and open to the public.

For more information, to submit proposals or book information tables, contact Ellyse Winter, ewinter2@brocku.ca,

Deadline for proposals: Monday, November 5.

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EVENT: Indigenous Perspectives on the War of 1812

INDIGENOUS PERSPECTIVES ON THE WAR OF 1812
Alternative Histories and Artistic Representations

Panelists:
Alan Corbiere, Ojibwe Cultural Foundation, Shelly Niro, artist, and curator Carol Jacobs, Brock University Elder in residence

Moderated by Renée Bedard, Tecumseh Centre

PLUS the exhibit:
Four Artists from Six Nations, paintings & photographs by Haudenosaunee artists

Friday, March 23rd, 3 – 5 pm | Niagara Artists Centre | 354 St. Paul Street | http://www.nac.org/home.html

This event is organized by the Social Justice and Equity Studies Program at Brock University in place of the Niagara Social Justice Forum for 2012. We hope you can join us.

Sponsors: Social Justice and Equity Studies MA, History Department, Aboriginal Education Council, Tecumseh Centre for Aboriginal Research and Education, Aboriginal Student Services, Women’s and Gender Studies, Brock University, and the Niagara Artists Centre

Questions? Contact Professor Margot Francis: mfrancis@brocku.ca

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nsjf 2011: Reel Injun

evening event of the 2011 Niagara Social Justice Forum:
REEL INJUN: A film by Neil Diamond

The evening event for the 2011 Niagara Social Justice Forum features a screening of the fantastic documentary Reel Injun followed by a short panel discussion. Panelists are: Laurie Kirk, Michelle Sherry and Lacey Lewis.

Schedule:
6:30-7:00 Enjoying victuals provided by Rise Above for purchase
7:00-7:05 Laurie Kirk will introduce the film
7:05-8:30 Screening of Reel Injun
8:30-8:40 Break
8:40-8:55 Panelists Laurie Kirk, Michelle Sherry and Lacey Lewis will speak to the film
8:55-9:30 Open the floor to the audience for questions and discussion

Location:
onefortyfive Gallery – 145 King Street, Downtown St. Catharines
For directions visit the onefortyfive Gallery website:
http://www.onefortyfive.com/145/Home.html
Cost of event: FREE!

About the Film: Reel Injun
Hollywood has made over 4000 films about Native people; over 100 years of movies defining how Indians are seen by the world.

Reel Injun takes an entertaining and insightful look at the Hollywood Indian, exploring the portrayal of North American Natives through the history of cinema.

Travelling through the heartland of America, Cree filmmaker Neil Diamond looks at how the myth of “the Injun” has influenced the world’s understanding – and misunderstanding – of Natives.

With candid interviews with directors, writers, actors and activists, including Clint Eastwood, Jim Jarmusch, Robbie Robertson, Sacheen Littlefeather, John Trudell and Russell Means, clips from hundreds of classic and recent films, including Stagecoach, Little Big Man, The Outlaw Josey Wales, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, and Atanarjuat the Fast Runner, Reel Injun traces the evolution of cinema’s depiction of Native people from the silent film era to today.

VIEW THE Reel Injun Trailer:

For more information about the film visit the Reel Injun website: http://www.reelinjunthemovie.com

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nsjf 2011: CFBU 103.7 fm Radio Interview

On Wednesday, March 30th, 2011 CFBU 103.7 fm Program Director Deborah Cartmer interviewed Assistant Professor of Visual Arts at Brock University and Niagara Social Justice Forum committee member Keri Cronin about the upcoming forum on April 9th.

To listen click on the link:  http://www.cfbu.ca/aud/sj.mp3

ABOUT: CFBU 103.7 fm
CFBU is a non profit corporation run by Brock University Student Radio(BUSR). They broadcast at a frequency of 103.7 fm, sending 250 mighty watts from the top of the Schmon Tower at Brock University, in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada.

Brock University Student Radio Collective
CFBU is operated by the Brock University Student Radio, a non-profit corporate body. To become a member of BUSR, individuals must become volunteers at CFBU. Community members must also pay an annual membership fee of $20.00.

For more information about CFBU 103.7 fm and/or to get involved with CFBU 103.7 fm as a volunteer or radio host visit: http://www.cfbu.ca

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nsjf 2011: Featured in the Brock News

THE BROCK NEWS:
Migration, Health Care among topics at Social Justice Forum
Posted by Samantha Craggs on Apr 4th, 2011

Craig Fortier (pictured below) of No One Is Illegal — Toronto, a group that fights for the rights of migrant people, will appear at the fifth annual Niagara Social Justice Forum April 9 at Pond Inlet.

Fortier will work with workshop participants to develop an analysis of why people migrate and how it is connected to capitalism and colonialism.

The forum aims to build relationships between student groups, activists and community organizations working on social justice issues in Niagara.

The all-day forum will feature music, film and interactive activities on numerous subjects, including environmental issues, animal rights, health care and religion.

Other workshop topics include:

  • Youth Homelessness: The Invisible Population
  • Social Media: Your Movement Needs You
  • Health Care Service Issues in Niagara
  • Niagara Threatened by Motorway Madness

There will be art exhibitions, a performance by the WomEnchant Choir (4 p.m., Pond Inlet) and a free screening of the Gemini award winning Reel Injun. It will be shown at 6.30 p.m. at the onefortyfive Gallery, 145 King St., St. Catharines.

The forum is free and no registration is required. For information on free childcare and American Sign Language interpretation, email socialjustice@brocku.ca.

For a full schedule, see niagarasocialjusticeforum.wordpress.com

Fortier, who grew up in Welland, described to The Brock News why he is involved.

***

Can you tell us a little about the workshop you’ll be leading?

No One Is Illegal (Toronto) is a group of immigrants, refugees and allies, which fights for the rights of all migrants to live with dignity and respect. The workshop will focus specifically on the links between colonization and migration and how the struggle for migrant justice affects all people in North America.

No One Is Illegal — Toronto opposes policies that cause displacement and exploit migrants. At the same time, it is part of our ongoing work to support and build alliances with Indigenous peoples in their fight against colonialism, displacement and the ongoing occupation of their land.

How did you become interested in this issue?

I grew up in Welland in the 1980s and 1990s when several plant closings and free trade agreements forced many people out of good jobs and into temporary and part-time work in call centres and other places. I was part of a big wave of young people in Niagara who were forced to move out of the region in search of job and education opportunities.

While studying accounting and economics at the University of Waterloo, I began to question the global economic policies that the governments of the wealthy countries (Canada, U.S., U.K., Japan, Europe) were trying to impose and their effects on both poor communities in the global South as well as working class communities (like Niagara) in the global North. I participated in demonstrations against the Free Trade Area of the Americas in Quebec City in 2001 and began to make links with people fighting against the forces of globalization that are responsible for displacement and exploitation. Upon moving to Toronto, No One Is Illegal was one of the few movements fighting to address these issues. I have been an organizer with No One Is Illegal since 2004.

Why is it important for the people of Niagara to be educated about this issue?

At the G20 meetings held in Toronto last June, the leaders of the 20 richest countries of the world agreed to policies of global austerity to address the economic crisis caused by the bailout of the big banks. In other words, these governments agreed to cut essential services like health care, education, employment insurance and to claw back our pensions to pay for those bailouts.

I think we will see unprecedented attacks on our social services over the next few years and another push to eliminate good paying jobs with part-time and temp work. Places like Niagara will be the hardest hit by these policies.

We need to begin a discussion in Niagara about how we can mobilize a unified struggle against more social cuts.

The online version of this story can be found at:
http://www.brocku.ca/brock-news/?p=9202

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